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What happens to graphite electrodes?
Graphite electrodes are used in electric arc furnaces for the production of steel. During the steelmaking process, the electrodes are subjected to extreme conditions including high temperatures, intense heat, and chemical reactions. As a result, several things can happen to graphite electrodes:

Consumption: The electrodes are gradually consumed due to the high temperatures and chemical reactions occurring in the furnace. This consumption leads to the gradual reduction in electrode size over time.

Oxidation: At the high temperatures present in the arc furnace, graphite electrodes can undergo oxidation, leading to the formation of carbon dioxide gas. This oxidation process contributes to the consumption of the electrodes.

Wear and Tear: The intense heat and mechanical stress in the furnace can cause wear and tear on the electrodes, leading to surface degradation and eventual breakage.


Graphite Electrode


Electrical Resistance Changes: As the electrodes are consumed and their dimensions change, the electrical resistance of the electrodes can also change, affecting the efficiency and performance of the arc furnace.

Replacement: Eventually, the electrodes become too small or worn out to be effective, requiring replacement. Regular maintenance and replacement of electrodes are necessary to ensure the efficient operation of the electric arc furnace.



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